Finalizing Diagrams and Configuring Discord

Last week started on Monday by creating a new issue for adding the LFP upstream master into the CONTRIBUTING document. I then made a new feature branch and started creating diagrams for the commits and their messages document. I also replied to Dr. Jackson’s comment on a merge request and said he can merge the CI/CD documents into master. I then started fixing the workflow diagrams according to Dr. Jackson’s review of them. I did this before continuing on the commits and their messages document since I was using the workflow commit diagrams as the base for these and if the old ones had issues so would the new ones based off these. I fixed the different diagrams and took some new screenshots for the sections that Dr. Jackson said these would work better than diagrams in. I then pushed my changes.

Tuesday started with quickly looking at the coordinating meeting minutes from earlier in the day before the weekly research meeting. In the meeting Dr. Wurst decided my top priority should be working on the SIGCSE paper and writing in the section that pertained to my research project this summer. Then after that would be Discord since we have scheduled a meeting for Friday to configure the LFP Discord server. After the meeting, I read through the SIGCSE paper and then wrote my section about what we have done this summer with researching and testing workflows and features in GitHub and GitLab. After doing that I started looking at how we should configure the LFP Discord server. I read the link Dr. Jackson posted earlier on an issue about Discord and it gave me some ideas we could use. I especially liked the idea of a welcome channel which is where the link to the server should point to to properly induct new users. There were other good ideas too including having different user roles, and limiting sending messages in certain channels. I created a new Discord server to test out a lot of these settings. I also started thinking about how to arrange our current Discord channels and maybe do this by channel type such having text channels be one group and GitLab projects (auto notification bots) be another. I also created a new issue that we discussed during our research meeting about creating a fallback plan for premium features if we weren’t able to keep our GitLab Gold tier membership and were reverted back to Free. Finally, I tested out the README install instructions for the BEAR-Necessities-Market project to see if I could get this to work since someone was having problems getting this to work. I eventually did get this work on both my computers.

Wednesday I checked the paper to see if I needed to make any edits on my section. I then started working on the commits and their messages diagrams. I updated the previously created ones to fix the same errors that the workflow ones had and created a diagram for branch synchronization commits. I added these to the document and opened a new merge request. I then worked on removing the old unneeded GitHub documentation and all GitHub references from all of the ProjectTemplate documents.

Thursday I further fixed the workflow and commits and their messages diagrams according to Dr. Jackson’s new comments. I then worked on writing a Discord configuration and tips guide. I did this by going through all of the user settings available in the Discord desktop application (and web UI) and wrote down what my recommendations were to maximize privacy and minimize annoyances that Discord can cause with its default settings (such as some of the gaming features). I also added the GitLab CI configuration file I created for BEAR-Necessities-Market in the testing group to the actual project on GitLab, so it doesn’t get lost if we delete these testing repositories.

Friday, we had the Discord configuration meeting. This went great and we quickly reached a lot of decisions. The most important topics we covered were the channel structure for the server and the different user roles. We decided that each project would have a channel group with its different channels underneath. We also decided that there would be three roles, Trustees who have all permissions, Mentors who act as moderators with some moderation permissions, and everyone else who have more limited permissions (there is also an admin role for non-trustees for need administrative permissions). We also decided there would be an announcements channel and that we would have a welcome channel to greet new members. After the meeting I started configuring the Discord server and successfully implemented the new configuration plan. Every project got its own group, an announcements channel that bots (such as Yappy) use to automatically post updates for project updates, a text channel, and a voice channel. I also made it so that all of the announcement channels could only be posted to by Trustees and Yappy. I then updated my Discord configuration guide to include the new changes to the channel structure and also added an invite link to our CONTRIBUTING document for the Discord server. Finally, I responded to some questions on Discord about where some documents and work was located in GitLab.

Saturday, I deleted all repositories and groups under the various testing groups we created this summer on GitLab and GitHub so that they weren’t lingering around past this summer. I also added DCO checks to the remaining projects that needed them and double checked that all of the projects had this enabled. Finally, I assigned myself to some issues to work on for next week and created a new issue for the broken screenshots in the various ProjectTemplate documents.

 

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